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Your tying space

I tidied my tying desk this evening, as I do once in a while. The maid normally remarks favourably when I do this, since she is not allowed to touch.

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I think the abandon with which I toss around dead birds and animals gets to her.

Thing is, when the desk is tidy, I can actually lock the thing, as my brother intended when he made it for me.

 

I have to say though, that I was a little worried. I was worried that it would not close. This anxiety stemmed from the fact that I have been on a long steady acquisition phase. I hadn’t realised it, but I have been collecting again (did I ever stop?), and the drawers are starting to overflow and  jam with packets of goodies.

I am happy to report that I was successful. I will not be needing another chest of drawers, and so will not be jeapardising my spot in the corner of the lounge. Which brings me to my point.

You MUST have a room, or better still a corner of a family room or lounge, where you can leave your fly tying kit out.

Trust me on this one. Until you do that, your tying will be frustrating, infrequent, and uninspiring. You cannot be hocked by having to clear away for dinner or guests. This will cramp your creative style in ways that you will only come to appreciate when you do get it right and have a good setup.

When you do get set up, a peaceful fulfillment will descend upon you, and you will become a much better husband and father. For me it has worked to have this space in a corner where I am not locked away from the family. I have a corner of a room in which the family can sit around while I tie, and it is a magic recipe for family harmony.  

Truttablog (1 of 1)

Now print this piece, and go and show it to your wife.

Good luck!

The Hardy anglers’ guide

When I was a child, my bedroom lead off a small study in our rather strangely designed house. That study was like a staging post between two long passages. One passage lead to the rest of the bedrooms, and the other to the lounge , dining room and kitchen.

In that study was a great big desk, at which my mother sat, with her “Facit”  adding machine and did the farm accounts.

Facit adding machine

She wound the handle vigorously, ran the lever across with gusto, and punched in numbers until the machine obliged with a delightful little ping, and she could write in the ledger.  If Dad came in from the farm for a break, we drank tea in that room, and sat about on the few easy chairs that were there. And from those chairs, my child’s eyes roamed across the book ends of a thousand boring books on the shelf that covered one whole wall.

That desk is in my home now, and it is tiny. The Facet, if it isn’t already there, belongs in a museum, and I don’t know what became of the bookshelf, but I will assume that it, like the desk, has shrunk.

One book from that shelf is still with me.

It is the 1926 Hardy anglers’ guide.

Hardys (1 of 9)

Unfortunately it is in an appalling state, and probably worth very little to anyone but me. To me it has immense sentimental value. Its appalling state is probably due to the fact that I carried that book everywhere as a young teenager, and devoured its contents. Despite its age, even all those years ago, it somehow was adequate a catalyst to get me fly fishing. Strange as that may sound, it was largely that old book, picked up in a state of boredom on some forgotten lazy afternoon, that was one of the things that sparked my interest in fly-fishing.

Its pages were filled with black and white pictures of heavy pewter-like reels of solid build, and split cane rods of various models, the descriptions and pictures of which did little to explain why there should be different models at all. Many items were endorsed by, or named after some fellow by the name of Halford.

Hardys (5 of 9)

In the front of the catalogue were informative articles on fly fishing. The book is from a forgotten age in which a catalogue was your “Google”, and the purveyor of tackle held a role more noble than that signaled by the ring of his cash register alone.

It could perhaps be said that my early exposure to something so dated as that little book, went a long way in cultivating an appreciation for the history and lore of fly fishing. The fact that the fragile book needed considerable TLC just to keep it from falling apart, perhaps contributed to my propensity to conserve the older things. And the fact that my grandfather’s Wheatley flyboxes, creel and rod hanging in the passage nearby, bore a resemblance to the tackle on those pages ,  served to strengthen my generational belonging within the realm of fly-fishing.

Since the late seventies, my eyes have been opened to books, magazines and slideshows, and fishing lessons that I could never have imagined. As I sat there in that big green wing backed chair, with my feet not reaching the floor, and turned those precarious pages, with the background noise of the “Facit” clanging away, I was not to know the enormity of the passion that was sparked in me that day.

Hardys (7 of 9)

Hardys (3 of 9)

Suck it down

It really is a terrible thing to have problems that keep you up at night.

Just last week I sat down to tie up a few halo hackle, Klinkhamer style things with grizzly hackle. No I don’t have a name for them. This whole halo hackle concept is a wonderfully South African idea bank, that has been brewing for a while, with several variants around. I seldom tie a batch of flies the same as the last, and each time I fiddle with the pattern, so don’t ask me to name them. Suffice it to say they have a cute orange thing on top to aid my eyesight, a bum that trails in the water to wiggle at the trout, and a grizzly hackle PLUS a sparsely wound coq de leon halo hackle that keeps them on top.

Klinkhamer (3 of 5)

 

I don’t know how others do their halo hackles, but for mine, I strip one side off a coq de leon spade, and then wind it twice. I sometimes trim a few fibres, if they end up too close to their neighbours.

I like this halo thing, in that it gives the flies a huge footprint for flotation, with just a few fibres, and it looks buggy.

* a note:  I say “Huge footprint for flotation” because coq de leoon hackles don’t come small. This is unfortunate in some ways, because their fibres are just so damned brilliant that if I could get them small enough I would use them on every fly. And that would quickly eat through the great big cape I got last year. Coq de leon fibres have zero fluff on them, and are as springy and shiny as a that radio aerial that one of my varsity lecturers used as a pointer.

So I like this halo thing. It’s local. It’s lekker.

But.

There is always a “but”. Trout suck surface flies down to eat them. I was reminded of this a while back when reading “Fly-fishing outside the box”. It is a brilliant book. Get it.

So, the trout has to suck my halo hackle fly down through the meniscus and get it into its mouth. It occurs to me that on account of those halo fibres, this may just be like trying to suck raw butternut through a hole in the side of the calabash. Just as an over-tied DDD, or one on a hook that has a narrow gape, I am at risk of seeing my fly enveloped in a glorious splash, but without a connection to the fish.  That worries me just a little. I have been wide awake for hours now.

But it doesn’t worry me too much, because British anglers have been big on daddy longlegs patterns for years, and they too have those broad splayed legs. Also, would the tippet not tether the fly in the meniscus more than the hackle could ever do? The other thing is the evidence. Maybe I am lucky, but I don’t seem to have a hooking problem with these flies. I don’t connect every time admittedly, but I don’t think they are problematic. They are catching lots of small trout up at Riverside at the moment. I must get up there and fish these flies to set my mind at ease.

Perhaps if I just keep tying the halo hackle sparse enough, all will be good.  Since a sparse halo hackle is what looks buggy, this works better anyway, right?.

OK. I feel better now. I think I will go back to sleep.

Thanks for listening.

Afterthought:  look out on the tab on this  blog called “ Topical subjects, Ideas and links”. I will soon be posting a set of links there all about the halo-hackle concept.  For a close up of the flies above, look at the fly gallery under ‘dry flies & emergers’.

Photo of the moment (12)

 

storm (1 of 1)

Clarity on matters aqueous

In his book “Fly fishing outside the box”, Peter Hayes says that one needs watchable fish in order to study their behavior.

That sounds like an obvious thing to say, but let’s consider it in the South African context:

In the Western Cape we have generally clear streams emanating from a rocky landscape. The streambed is often pale, even whitish in colour, and although the slightly brackish water gives the streambed a yellow tinge, you still commonly have many pale areas against which trout spotting opportunities abound.

In the Eastern Cape the streams are a bit more inclined to dirty after rain. There is also an abundance of deep green pools. However, between those pools are ample areas of mottled stone, incorporating paler shades.

IMG_0166

(can you see the trout?)

I have had many exciting trout spotting experiences  on streams like the Bokspruit, and Riflespruit. Moments when you can’t decide whether to employ the fly rod or the camera, but in either event you can spend long moments relishing the sight of a finning Rainbow. I say “relish” because there is a delight in just watching these lithe and fleeting fish. They appear and then blend, and re-appear, and watching them becomes an exercise in concentration.

And that exercise yields information every time. Every observation opportunity is one in which you can imprint on your mind another example of how and where these fish move, what scares them, how close you can get to them, and a myriad other tiny observations. These are observations that we learn from, probably without realising it. One day you will be explaining something about trout to a beginner angler, and he will ask “How do you know that?”.  You won’t immediately know how it is that you came to know it, but it will be because you have watched these fish.

Here in KZN, I experience fewer opportunities to watch fish. It is difficult to explain quite why, but let me attempt it anyway. For one thing, and I am generalising here, we have a lot of deep green water. That is water that, even when clean, appears bottle green, and is very difficult to look into. We consider it clean, and it is, but a lot of it is deep, and perhaps more importantly, it is against a mud, or black rock bottom.

Reekie Lyn bottle green (1 of 1)

Even in the more shallow runs, the river bed is not one that lends itself to trout spotting quite like other provinces. And then too we have a fair amount of cultivation in our catchments, so that in summer one encounters water that is not as sparkling as it could be.

PD (1 of 1)

We can of course head up into the mountains more, as Peter Brigg does, but even Peter remarked the other night how we don’t have trout spotting opportunities quite like the Western Cape. I agree with him. The other thing to consider, is that we are often searching for Brown Trout, and they are a wily prey if ever there was one! But somewhere like the upper Bushmans does offer some opportunity to observe our prey.

jnl 1-6-2

I think that the point of all this, is to say that even a stillwater fly-fisherman would do well to seek out trout spotting opportunities in order to build his knowledge of the fish that we hunt.  And so, regardless of the small size of the fish we may encounter in some of the thinner, higher waters, I treasure every opportunity I get to go looking for fish. In particular, I look forward to our regular forays to the North Eastern Cape. I would encourage fellow KZN anglers to spread their wings a little, and visit the berg, The NE Cape, and the Western Cape.  It has been far too long since I last wet my own feet in a Western Cape stream.  I feel a trip coming on.

Rain and rivers

With the onset of our spring rains having occurred in some places and not in others, the weather is foremost on the mind of the river fishermen. In fact our conversations are just a little obsessive at the moment.

This is why:

picnic rock (1 of 1)

Mooi River South Africa-19

photo of the moment (11)

 

Rainbow (1 of 1)

The honey troglodyte

 

I have been tying along a particular theme recently, that being nymphs with a V-Rib body and a tungsten bead. On this one I was focusing on getting a glowing translucence in the body:

troglodyte (1 of 13)

Place a 2.5mm black tungsten bead on a #14 or #16 nymph hook.

troglodyte (2 of 13)

Tie in a rough base (for grip) of bright yellow silk (70 denier used here)

troglodyte (3 of 13)

Tie in a tail of natural blonde squirrel tail, and use the tag end to build up the thorax a little , so securing the bead.

troglodyte (4 of 13)

Tie in a small bunch of cock pheasant tail fibres as shown above.

troglodyte (5 of 13)

Now splay and spread the fibres either side of the hook shank in two bunches of equal size.

troglodyte (6 of 13)

Bring the pheasant tail fibres back to the back of the bead as indicated above.

troglodyte (7 of 13)

Now tie in a strand of honey coloured V-Rib, with the end in tight against the base of the bead, and wrap your silk back to the back of the thorax position.

Now dub in a fairly tightly wound sausage of a wiry gray dubbing mix containing some rabbit and ice dub or SLF.

troglodyte (8 of 13)

Bring the pheasant tail thorax back over the dubbing, secure with a few wraps of thread, and add in a strand of holographic tinsel at this point.

troglodyte (9 of 13)

Use your silk to raise the V-Rib to a vertical position, and tie the tinsel back to the back of the thorax.

troglodyte (10 of 13)

Now wrap the v-rib in tight wraps back towards the tail. Before making the last two wraps, place a dot of super glue on the silk underbody and then wrap the v-rib over that , bringing it to the position where the tail was tied in. The super glue just helps secure this tough material, since we don’t want to create any bulk at this point in the fly, and will tie it down with only two wraps of thread.

troglodyte (11 of 13)

Now pull the holographic tinsel back down the back of the body and secure with a single wrap of thread. Then dab a very small amount of superglue onto the thread, and perform three wraps, and snip the thread and tinsel away.

troglodyte (12 of 13)

Use a dark brown marker to colour the yellow thread wraps near the tail. Now apply a thin layer of UV glue along just the back of the body, and up over the thorax cover, and dry with the UV torch. Don’t coat the underside of the body, as we want to keep the ribbed appearance there.

troglodyte (13 of 13)

Stroke the pheasant tail fibres back by hand, and thin them out with a very fine pointed pair of scissors.

This is the finished fly.

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