Waters & words

technical and tackle

Hook thoughts

TTP (2)

Tips, Theories & Pointers

Back in the day, nymph hooks were quite the thing: we started getting hooks that  had a longer shank to accommodate the nymph patterns we were all tying, and I for one, went crazy on them.

hooks n tippet (1 of 4)

Our human aesthetics (and tunnel vision on the matter) dictated that a nice long hook fitted with the nymph shape.

But nowadays it seems to have gone full circle, and for good reason I think.

Take a look at these: the shank lengths are about the same (so we can tie the same nymph on them right?). But look at the gape of the top hook (old style nymph hook) vs the bottom two hooks …the middle (modern) hook in particular:

hooks n tippet (2 of 4)

Here are the hook models by the way:

hooks n tippet (3 of 4)

The sizes are somewhat irrelevant aren’t they!  Just pick how long you want your nymph to be, and then tie it on a hook with a nice big fish catching gape. Many times, you will find you are tying what you see as a #12, on a hook of say #10. I say it doesn’t matter.

Note:  a TTP topic still to come: Tying your materials offset so as not to block that gape….and the release this week by BIDOZ of their offset beads will no doubt feature in this upcoming topic.


TTP (1)

Tips, Theories and pointers

My friend Wayne Stegen made a valid observation the other day.

He was advocating the use of an anchor when float tubing, especially when imitating naturals.  As he put it, when you are dragging around a large woolly bugger due to un-noticed drift, it doesn’t really matter. But when you are trying to inch along a tiny damsel, or dead drift a snail, and your retrieve is being accelerated without your knowledge by your drifting tube, you are not applying the formula you thought you were.

Do you know whether you are drifting or not?  I fish an old doughnut tube and kick gently against the wind, and believe I am standing still, based on landmarks on the shore. Maybe it is not accurate enough. A kick boat floats higher and drifts more.

Food for thought!

Briarmains (12 of 24)