Waters & words

Spotting Trout in stillwater

A piece of open stillwater can be  a bland thing. The other day Neil and I were out on some lovely, but somehow dull water. There was a dead calm, and we didn’t see or touch a fish.  I suggested that the day was a good advert for stream fishing.

But sometimes it is very different.

Today I was out alone on a small piece of water. Being mid winter the water was crystal clean, but more importantly the light was right. Light is so important in fly-fishing, but the right light is also so very difficult to describe.

Suffice to say that one wants little or no smoke or haze, and generally the light  behind you, or at least high overhead. You want your polaroids to be working a treat. That day, the sun was in fact ahead of me, but there was a steep bank opposite, such that a small band of water was without sheen or reflection.

Trout (1 of 1)

It was weeded up close to where I was waded, but twenty yards out there was a channel. I suddenly caught sight of a trout there, moving quite fast, and the under-water world opened up. Funny how that happens: You are looking at the surface, and then suddenly something moves, your eyes adjust, and now you are looking through the surface instead of at it.

Trout (1 of 3)

Here is a little help (since I had the all important help of having seen it move.

Trout spotted(1 of 3)

And some more images of other fish during the morning:

Trout (2 of 3)

Trout (3 of 3)

You are not sure if what you think is the fish, is in fact it, are you?

Neither was I !

They would appear and then disappear again, like ghosts. Given that it was flat calm most of the time, I daren’t cast until a gust of wind came. The fish were moving up and down, and I could only see them when the breeze abated. But when the calm set in, I would surely line them. So I waited for Nirvana:  I needed to spot a fish in dead calm, and keep it in my vision until a puff of wind ruffled the surface. Then I would cast to a point 2 yards in front of the fish, and wait for it to intercept. Maybe tweak the fly as it came along.

In an hour and a half, that scenario presented itself just once. It was a cast demanding a double haul to get there.  The fly landed perfectly. Although the water was now riffled, I saw the mouth open as the Trout took my fly. I struck.

And it came free.

I did land two fish later on, fishing blind, but for me, fooling that fish earlier, was what made my day, even if I didn’t get a hand to it.  And was it worth and hour and a half?

Most definitely!

 

Footnote. The photos were taken at ISO800 on 1/80th of a second and zoomed to about 800 to 1000mm. They were lightened and contrast and highlights enhanced in Lightroom to make the fish more visible. When there was no wind at all I concentrated on photographing them instead of trying to catch them, as I knew I wouldn’t stand a chance!

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One response

  1. Pingback: August 1, 2014: Feather and Fin Link Round-Up | Feather and Fin

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