Waters & words

Posts tagged “Sterkspruit

no 36

In the last week we have switched on the under-floor heating in the lounge, and I have worn a jacket of some sort most days. By my reckoning that signals the close of number 36….my 36th contiguous flyfishing season since this thing bit me all those years ago.

Sitting here in my living room , armed with a good cup of coffee and a reflective mood, I have just paged through my journal, and tried to get a sense of how it was. Tried for a capsule that sums it all up. Something that captures it in a way that lets me roll it around in my mind without missing any of the good bits.

One can add the numbers I guess: 200 hours of fishing over 45 days on ten stillwaters and eight different streams, and just under a hundred Trout. A fair season by those numbers I guess, but it doesn’t tell the full story.

130 of those 200 hours on streams, x number of Browns vs Rainbows, so many on dries, so many on nymphs. I have all this info. I could probably add up the kms travelled the diesel burnt, the coffee, beer and whisky drunk.

Meaningless, meaningless.

I think it is better summed up as follows: (in terms of the piscatorial quarry at least)

We broke the rules and started 3 days early on the very lower Bushmans, where we were shown a toffee. That is always a good way to start.  There were some trips to the Lotheni, a few months apart, but they were lean. The trips to the Mooi were not, and there were more of those this season than last. The Mooi and the Bushmans produced some big fish for me. Bigger ones for my Facebook buddies it seems, or was that camera angle? 

Mooi River-22

I was happy with mine.  The Umgeni showed me more good fish, and more toffees than ever before. It was real “Rub your snout in that” stuff! . The lower Sterkspruit and the lower Bokspruit were challenging, but the upper reaches of both offered up their bounty. The Vlooikraal was as special as it always is.

Memorable fish?

A 17 incher in the sleet with Jan in October at Reekie Lyn.

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A 19 incher from Krantz pool with PD.

PD’s 18 incher from the Sterkspruit…

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……sure it wasn’t my fish, but you asked about memorable fish right?  And you didn’t ask if I caught them.

My first day of an Eastern Cape trip got me a 14 inch Rainbow on a nymph fishing with Roy. My last day got me a 14 inch Brown on a dry …stalked, fooled, hooked and landed with PD as my witness. 

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“Book-ends!” he remarked after he had congratulated me on that last fish, and I thought  about that over a cup of streamside coffee off the camp stove while he went fishing. 

There was a fish of some 13 inches on the Bushmans right towards the death, that was special. Several fly changes, lots of stalking and creeping about, and eventually I fooled him, alone, and without witnesses. The solitude of a good fish on an empty river with no one to ‘high-five’ you is, I think, a healthy thing.

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But the fish that had my eyes swirling  in the same way that Kaa the snake was able to dazzle  Mowgli, was that Umgeni fish at ‘The Black Hole’ . Like PD’s one on the Sterk, I didn’t catch it. Unlike PD’s on the Sterk, no-one caught it. I however, photographed it. Twice. I put about 10 different fly patterns over it.  I spotted it feeding no less than four times, and I rose it three times, pricking it on two of those occasions. 

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That fish had me beaten. It is also the one thing that has me looking forward to no 37.

Now that, my friends, is surely the fish of the season!

……….My next post will be the season between the fish……………which in so many ways is larger and more significant.


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Photo of the moment (35)

Anton (1 of 1)


Slowing it down

I think I have been moving too fast.

Mtshezana (18 of 30)

In years gone by (in fact right up until this week), I have been the guy moving on up. I glance at a bit of water, metaphorically shake my head, and move on. If a spot is half likely, I might dust it with a few casts, then tell myself I was right about it, and move on. The first cast at a pool or run is the best one, I reason, and each subsequent presentation will have diminishing returns.

Now don’t get me wrong, I still believe there is merit to that approach, but I think that I for one, am at risk of taking it too far.

If I stop a while and think about it, I might just realise that I have been shown up by some of my flyfishing buddies. I might just be a little red faced at having passed up a piece of pocket water, only to have the bloke catch up with me at lunch time, and tell me how many fat Browns he pulled out of just that spot.

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Just this last season, Graeme was fishing a pool on the Mkomazi without result. I was standing behind him getting some photos. The pool looked great, so I hovered behind him for a while, fully expecting him to get something. I really did believe he would. For a while. After about ten or fifteen minutes, I lost that belief. He had put drift after perfect drift over the sweet spot in the pool, as well as every piece of water either side of that, without result. I could not fault his technique, his stealth, or his presentations, but I developed a belief that there must be no fish there. Or perhaps that somehow, through no fault of his, they had spooked.

I put my camera away and moved on to fish my allotted piece above him.

No sooner had I taken the fly from the keeper, and he was whistling for my attention. He was into a great fish. A real beauty.

Mkomazi (42 of 47)

Then on a recent rip to the mountains of the North eastern Cape, I was on the Sterkspruit at Birkhall. I was at a deep run that flowed tight against a cliff in the deep shade, and with a side current that came into that, almost at a right angle, in an even deeper funnel of bubbling water. It seemed the perfect place to try my hand at some euro style nymphing. That is not something I do very often, but I figured I would give it a go. I did. I tried it for a while on both pieces of water, on either side of the gravel bar that I was standing on. The gravel bar, that I soon got to thinking had me standing above and over the trout. I was in the bright sun too. I quickly lost faith in what I was doing. It went against everything I have been taught, everything I know. The fish could see me. I was in front of them, and not behind them. It felt wrong. I figured I would write off any thoughts of catching anything, but that I would use the opportunity to try to perfect the method. To practice. I added weight to the fly and I flicked it again. I concentrated on leading the fly through the run, using clues to guess whether the fly was ahead or behind where my line entered the water.  I lifted the fly, and tried to establish if it was lifting off the bottom in an enticing way or whether perhaps I had it in mid flow, in no-mans land, and was raising it closer to the surface in a futile act.  I practiced, and practiced, and tried again.  And I caught two trout.

Carabas (26 of 35)

I think I have been moving too fast.


Wet socks and Whisky

My mind is a whirl of flaming Lombardy poplars, water clear and cool; of shafts of sunlight cutting across the mountains and igniting the yellowing veld.

Carabas (6 of 35)

Whisky from the bottle cap, ice on boots, and rocks on two wheel tracks. Rods, flies, cussing, jokes and dust.

Carabas (1 of 35)

Cold wet socks.

Trout.

Carabas (26 of 35)

Nuts, mussels and biltong from the backpack.

Bokspruit (21 of 32)

The Birkhall porch: swirls of light and clinking glasses in the night. Tobacco smoke and fishing plans.  Roads: ever curling , descending, rising, twisting and demanding another gear.

Rhodes travels (3 of 28)

The veld: whisked and brushed by wind, seed-heads bowing and bucking, in browns and pale sun-washed ambers.

Sterkspruit (14 of 18)

Footfalls: plodding and tired in wet boots, stumbling on stones, sliding into the water, jarring knees, and pushing aside ever resisting swathes of grass and current.

Kraai (27 of 37)

Fatigue. Freedom. Beer. Faces of true friends ignited in the day’s sunlight, smiling, jovial and a little reddened. Steaming plates of hot food. Coffee. Sleep. Tea. Frost. sunlight and wind.

Rhodes travels (23 of 28)

Punching fly-casts. Fish, fleeting, fleeing, watery and dreamlike. Sheep paths. Tippet and gink. Wet poplar leaves. Tongues of current and water spreading over pale gravel and stone.

Carabas (25 of 35)

Drifts, flicks, drag, and lightning takes. Sleep, drive, walk, fish, walk, drive, drink, eat, sleep.

Bokspruit (30 of 32)

Repeat.

Bokspruit (1 of 32)


Cool bunnies

Easter time, or more specifically late March through all of April, is a magical time for us trout fly-fisherman here on the  eastern seaboard of South Africa.

We have just come out of the stifling heat of February, which is about as “un-trouty” as you can get, and those of us with European origins are feeling ever so slightly more comfortable, no matter how African we profess to be.

Our rainy season is drawing to an end. We can still get rain at this time of year. In fact we can get rather a lot, but the wild unpredictability of our thunderstorms is abating.

Bushmans (1 of 1)

A month ago, there was a not unreasonable chance that the river would turn into a raging torrent of chocolate while you were on your way there, or while you were busy fishing it. And I am not talking about Easter egg chocolate here. I am talking about mud. Mud was in January and February, and it came with water that more often than not was over twenty degrees C (68 degrees F). The weather was humid too, so that even on a cloudy day, you could feel sweaty.

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There were trout to be had for sure, but all the talk was around releasing them carefully and water temperatures vs oxygenation.

Now, as the season turns, mornings have a crispness to them. Stepping into a stream in the morning is a thing that you hold your breath for. The moment that the stream clutches at your old ragged wading longs, you find yourself standing on tip toes!

Lotheni (1 of 42)

The grass changes too. This part of the world is all about grass. It its natural state, and thankfully our mountain streams are largely in that state, there is barely a tree to be seen. The grass bolts and produces seed heads in late February. By late March it has taken on a yellowness. One doesn’t really notice this insidious change, but when you look at your December photographs, against the ones you took yesterday, you suddenly see it.

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I don’t know that the trout feed more, or are more willing. It is hard to tell. Being a cold water fish they are supposed to be happier, so we tell ourselves that they are. In reality it is probably that we are happier, and fishing better as a result. We certainly get out more, so we catch more fish.

Mkhomazi Brown (1 of 1)

The light gets a little softer. It makes for great photography. The rain that falls is invariably cooler, and raingear and a change of clothes become important. In mid summer, it didn’t matter if you got drenched: you were either wet and warm or dry and warm. Now you want a jacket on the back seat.

When the sun is shining, it can hang above you in an azure blue sky all day, and you don’t have that feeling that its rays are penetrating your skin and boiling your blood beneath.

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I for one feel a little safer not having to rely on an unseen layer of sunscreen alone to protect me from certain incineration! Days of sheltering in the shade at some point of the day, and returning home physically drained to swat mosquitoes all night, are thankfully gone.

Now you can walk the veld with something of a spring in your step.

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It is a magical time, but it passes all too quickly. It is a time when the rivers will be at their best, and although the stillwaters will be good too, they will be good right through the winter, when the rivers are closed. So, figuring that one should make full use of this fleeting opportunity I advocate getting out there on our streams and rivers.

It is an Easter thing.

End of lent.

Good river trout are to be had.

Go get ‘em!

Drakensberg (1 of 1)


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Photo of the moment (24)

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Photo of the moment (19)

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Going back

Once every two years we go back to the North Eastern Cape.

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It’s not often enough, I know, but we figured, when we started this thing all those years ago, that we could sell every second year to wives and family. In fact we were confident that we could ensure the event would take place if we did it seldom enough. And we were right I suppose, because we have indeed been back every second year like clockwork.

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